docked awe

c. 1300, “Church father,” from Old French doctour, from Medieval Latin doctor “religious teacher, adviser, scholar,” in classical Latin “teacher,” agent noun from docere “to show, teach, cause to know,” originally “make to appear right,” causative of decere “be seemly, fitting,” from PIE root *dek– “to take, accept.”


“doctor | Origin and meaning of doctor by Online Etymology Dictionary,” Online Etymology Dictionary, accessed 9th May 2018, https://www.etymonline.com/word/doctor

verso voce

]

approaching
with
living voice
with
(silent) reading

slowing slanting
towards an I
that had
once written
of voice           [in       multiple voices]

as
the living voice’s
– distance decreases
– difference absorbs
the living voice
waits as words brake

the living voice will re-member the once written

[